NcodeX Project, Demos of tools and functionalities in earlier and current development
last updated: Mar/16/2021


The following demos showcase our project work in creating state-of-the-art tools for text-analysis (such as the Mayan-READ prototype), metadata annotation, IIIF-based digital collections of Maya texts, plus resources on text encoding developed jointly with the Script Encoding Initiative (run by Dr. Deborah Anderson)
To access each demo, click on the "View" icons to the right


DM Number DM label RS description DM links/access
DM-01 Text-capture tool 1 w/Phase-One font Animated demo of NcodeX early-version prototype. Text-analysis at the glyph-block (collocation) level enhanced by Phase-One fonts. Selected passage from the Dresden Codex, page D.34a  Demonstrated by Carlos Pallán, Jul. 2019
DM-02 Text-capture tool 2 w/Phase-One font Animated demo of NcodeX early-version prototype. Text-analysis at the individual sign (graphemic) level enhanced by Phase-One fonts. Selected passage from the Dresden Codex, page D.34a  Demonstrated by Carlos Pallán, Jul. 2019
DM-03 Mayan-READ with Glyphary tools Animated demo of The Classic Maya Text Repository showing the link between text and image using the Mayan-READ research toolset. Demonstrated by Andrew Glass, Oct. 2020



The NcodeX Project is a collaboration between the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Bonn, Germany, the Script Encoding Initiative (SEI), the Unicode Consortium, the Latin American Library at Tulane University, the Florida Institute for Hieroglyphic Research, and other partner institutions.
This project was made possible by a Digital Humanities Advancement Grant (HAA-268887-20) from the National Endowment for the Humanities; two Adopt-a-Character grants from the Unicode Consortium (AAC-Mayan-2019 and -21), and a Dan C. Hazen Fellowship from SALALM (Seminar for the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials).


SEI work on Maya hieroglyphs has received support from NEH grant PR‐253360‐17 and PR-268710-20, as well as a Google Research grant. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this website do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Unicode Consortium, or SALALM.



Special thanks to Matthews Rechs and Christopher Chapman
at Adobe Inc. for supporting our Project with complimentary
Creative Cloud licenses that enhance several aspects of our worklows